Tag Archives: Catherine Ryan

SUPER FUN KID ACTIVITIES AT CAPE ANN READS TODAY AT CITY HALL!

From noon to four this afternoon City Hall will be abuzz with a special celebration exhibiting the work of Cape Ann children’s book authors and illustrators. Each author and illustrator has a table with their projects. Come meet and talk to the authors about their original stories. The illustrators have created coloring sheets taken from the pages of the books to give to guests. The award ceremony, hosted by Mayor Sefatia, takes place at 1:30. This is a unique and new book fair created by Cape Ann’s four library directors, Deborah Kelsey (Gloucester), Deborah French (Essex), Sara Collins (Manchester), Cindy Grove (Rockport), and art director Catherine Ryan.

I am looking forward to seeing all the artists coloring sheets. My Monarch Butterfly project and documentary film Beauty on the Wing: Life Story of the Monarch Butterfly first incarnation was an illustrated book, then photo exhibit, and now film.

The illustration above is of a male and female Monarch mating. The Monarchs fly up into a tree and stay joined together, abdomen to abdomen, for about four hours. The blue butterflies are a cousin of the Monarchs, the Blue Tiger of India (Tirumala limniace), but you can color your butterflies anyway you see fit–I’d love to see a pair of rainbow Monarchs 🙂

 

MONARCH CATERPILLAR NONUPLETS

Thank you so much to my friends Charles and George Ryan and Mom Catherine for helping with the Monarch film project. Charles and George Ryan Monarch caterpillars ©Kim Smith 2015

Nature’s Compass ~  My current group of nine Monarchs are synchronized, all lined up on a north-south axis and pupating within moments of each other.Monarch caterpillars north south ©Kim Smith 2015JPG

From the moment a caterpillar emerges, internally it begins to form the adult parts of its body. Adult Monarchs have magnetic receptors along the inner margins of their thorax, which help guide them on their south to north, north to south migration. I wonder if the magnetic receptors are here at work in the caterpillars north-south pattern of pupating.

Monarch caterpillars J-shape, pupating ©Kim Smith 2015All nine hung in a J-shape on the north-south axis as well. Since I took this photo three more have also pupated on the north-south axis. In the above photo, you can see the center caterpillar and caterpillar to the far left are in the midst of changing from a caterpillar to a chrysalis (pupating).